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News Sources: Logical Fallacies

Some Common Logical Fallacies

Common Logical Fallacies…

 

Correlation/Causation Error: Just because 2 things are present together does not mean that one caused the other.

  • 98% of convicted felons are bread eaters. Bread should be banned from school lunches.
  • Middle school students at Mid-Pacific wear uniforms, but high school students don't. The average GPA in the class of 2021 dropped between the 8th and 9th grades so clearly, students will get better grades in high school if they wear uniforms.

 

Ad Hominem Fallacy: Attacking the character or motives of a person or source who is stating an argument, rather than a critique of the argument’s merit.

  • President Obama’s plan for medical insurance reform is a farce because he’s just a basketball playing jock that didn’t even start for his high school team.
  • Of course our opponents in this debate are going to be for the #MeToo movement, they're girls! 

 

Either/Or Fallacy (Also known as the Excluded Middle Fallacy): An argument that makes it seem as though there are just two choices when, in reality, there are more.

  • We must raise taxes on wealthy Americans making over $250,000 per year or the National Debt will balloon out of control.
  • Failure to build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico will allow migrants to freely cross the border. 

 

Straw Man Fallacy: Taking a person’s argument and expanding it to an extreme.

  • The opposing team wants to lower the legal drinking age to 18. This kind of unfettered and unrestricted access to intoxicants leads to addiction, job loss, and death on the Nation’s roads.
  • Proponents of the border wall between Mexico and the United States want to turn America into a fortified fortress completely closed off from the rest of the world, uninterested, and indifferent to anything beyond NASCAR, the Kardashians, and junk food.

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